SDG Two: “Zero Hunger” is Currently Unattainable by 2030

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Goal Two of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals is to achieve “Zero Hunger,” or further explained as  “End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.” According to the World Food Programme, 821 million people (1 in 9 persons) go to sleep without food each night. An even greater statistic is that 1 in 3 people suffer from some form of malnutrition. In a global perspective, these issues are not necessarily from a shortage of food, but rather, a lack of access to it. Some may not be able to afford it, while others may be in areas with a supply that doesn’t support their whole population. There are even “hunger seasons” which occur in agricultural areas and communities in some countries. This is when food runs out between planting and harvesting. This is especially detrimental to people living in rural areas and farmers, who only rely on what is grown.

Most speakers were on the same page when speaking on this issue, in which, the world is not on track to achieve Goal 2 by 2030 unless changes and improvements begin now. The main topics and issues that were continuously brought up were agriculture, poverty, and climate change.  

Agriculture was brought up by most speakers who mentioned how it plays a crucial role, and therefore, must be prioritized and expanded. The representative of Mali talked about how the agriculture sector is the backbone of their country but is facing challenges like ensuring food to their growing population, especially in the context of climate change. Climate change is a huge issue which affects many other matters aside from food insecurity. Climate change deals with natural disasters, droughts, and floods which affect food production and distribution. Many also brought up the link between poverty and hunger/malnutrition. Poverty and hunger are in a cyclical pattern. Poverty is a driver of hunger, especially how most impoverished people in the world live in rural areas and therefore rely on agriculture to support them.

Meeting: Committee on Agriculture development, food security and nutrition; 73rd Session
Location/time/date: Conference Room 2, UN HQ-NYC; 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM,
October 12, 2018
Speakers:
● The Chair (Guatemala) Representatives of Egypt (on behalf of the Group of 77 and
China), Myanmar (on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations), Malawi (on
behalf of the Least Developed Countries), Guyana (on behalf of the Caribbean
Community), Maldives (on behalf of the Alliance of Small Island States), Morocco (on
behalf of the African States), El Salvador (on behalf of the Community of Latin
American and Caribbean States), India, the Russian Federation, Costa Rica, the Sudan,
Algeria, Afghanistan, Nicaragua Jamaica, Bangladesh, Nigeria, Ukraine, Cambodia,
China, the United Arab Emirates, Tonga, Mozambique, Morocco, Brazil, Ethiopia,
Zambia, the Philippines, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Mali,
Finland, Indonesia, Nepal, Burkina Faso, and Saudi Arabia, as well as by the observer for
the Holy See.
● The representative of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Written by: WIT Representative Yasmeen Razack

 

 

 

Eleventh Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Name

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Representatives gathered to discuss the United Nations Global Geo-spatial Information Management through a variety of discussions. The conference began as the  representative of the Netherlands was nominated president of this conference by acclamation. He began the discussion by claiming new data storage and distribution techniques should be reflected in the work of the UN. By adapting to new circumstances, the conference should continue to fulfill its mandate and role by taking the steps to maintain the quality of digitized databases. The Director of UNSD continued the conversation, asking the quality of information to be used in its appropriate context. He stated the main challenge regarding the integration of various information systems, statistical and geospatial, is their efficacy. Such systems must come together into one national information integrated system such that it can support the various policy concerns at the local, regional, and national levels. Furthermore, better communication is necessary as well, as member states are shown to be doing good work, but struggling to connect such work to the events at the high policy level so that they can receive sufficient resources. In addition to the election of the president, the officers of the conference were elected as well, along with the chairs, vice chairs, and rapporteurs of the four technical meetings. Ormeling then presented about the importance of national geospatial information. He claimed the SDG metrics for monitoring and measuring processes are vital to determine the lifecycles of SDGs, as geographical locations need identification. He reinstated the UNGGIM is not physically doing any work in member states, but rather giving advice and providing procedures. The meeting ended as Kerfoot presented about milestones of the past conferences, covering various aspects of their work including advancing national standardization, outreach to Africa, and establishing and improving operations.

Meeting: Eleventh United Nations Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Names by the Economic and Social Council

Date/Location: Tuesday, August 8th, 2017; 10:30-13:00; Conference Room 3

Speakers: Representative of Germany; Representative of Netherlands; Director of UNSD; Representative of Canada; Representative of New Zealand; Representative of Canada; Representative of Indonesia; Representative of Australia; Representative of Norway; Representative of Palestine; Representative of South Africa; Representative of Azerbaijan; President of Conference; Director of UN Department of Statistical Information; Helen Kerfoot, Representative of Canada; Ferjan Ormeling

Written By: WIT Representative Janet Lee