Peacekeeping in the Post-2015 Agenda (Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations)

width_650.height_300.mode_FillAreaWithCrop.pos_Default.color_WhiteThe Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations discussed what aspects of peacekeeping should be addressed in the post-2015 agenda.

Kazakhstan stated that the peacekeeping mandate needed to shift from being purely military to include non-military, food, and energy security; the Filipino representative also desired consideration for disease control. Kazakhstan called for the participation of women and consideration of differing ideologies and cultures in missions. The Zambian Permanent Representative echoed these sentiments while paying particular attention to the protection of civilians.

The Permanent Representative of Bhutan supported India’s proposal for a memorial to honor the sacrifices of deceased peacekeepers. Bhutan called for the integration of medical technology and aerial assets in operations. The representative looked forward to the annual report of the High Level Independent Panel on Peacekeeping for practical suggestions.

The Bangladeshi Permanent Representative hoped for effective communication channels between the Secretariat, Security Council, troop contributing countries (TCCs), foreign military contingents, and peacekeepers. Bangladesh pointed towards educating peacekeepers on dealing with specific demographics, having conducted child interaction training with peacekeepers last year.

Japan highlighted the importance of financial sustainability and longer training to increase efficacy.

The Venezuelan, Nepalese, and El Salvadorian representatives stated that force should be a last resort. Venezuela stated that an offensive mandate must respect the UN charter and cannot allow peacekeepers to abuse their legal immunity. However, he also noted that sending poorly equipped peacekeepers to carry out clearly unachievable mandates is counterproductive. To that end, El Salvador called for the recruitment of new TCCs and for their involvement in all stages of mandate drafting.

Algeria and Serbia were concerned of the increasing correlation between peacekeeper casualties and terrorist activity. The former supported training on organized crime and drug trafficking. He also advocated for regional decision-making, referring to the African Union as a successful precedent.

Meeting: Special Committee on Peacekeeping Operations 2015 Substantive Session – 241st meeting
Date & Location: 18 February 2015. Conference Room 2, United Nations Headquarters, New York
Written By WIT Representative: Alis Yoo
Edited By WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Panel Discussion on Sustainable Consumption and Production in the Post-2015 Agenda

SCP2Mr. Hoballah introduced the importance of sustainable consumption and production (SCP) in the post-2015 development agenda. Mr. Patriota explained that sustainable development requires transforming consumption and production patterns. The the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns (10YFP) should accelerate the shift towards SCP, which will promote a universal, transformative agenda that eradicates poverty in a sustained fashion. All countries must promote SCP and change behaviors and values to balance overconsuming nations with greater responsibilities. Sustainable development is about teaching future generations to cooperate internationally and be aware and respectful of diversity and humanity. SCP promotes development that is socially inclusive, economically viable, provides access to sanitation and health services, increases wages, and encourages gender equality. It must be embraced by civil society and the private sector in order  to support negotiations for the post-2015 agenda. The Permanent Representative of Finland discussed three aspects of SCP: to promote effective, efficient use of resources, to innovate, and to fulfill basic needs in a sustainable manner. The 10YFP is an important tool for implementing SCP, but it requires public and private financing; therefore, private incentives must be aligned with public goals. Mr. Hoballah discussed financing, policy, and targets of SCP, including contributions to climate mitigation. Mr. Ngculu addressed the importance of SCP to support 10YFP. Poverty remains the greatest challenge confronting developing countries. The 10YFP has a large role to play in post-2015 for Africa. Ms. Alfieri discussed national SCP policies and cited indicators as key instruments for implementing the post-2015 agenda. She also discussed SCP’s relationship to statistics and the environment. Ms. Riddlestone addressed civil society’s role in implementation and warned that the world is consuming 50% more resources than it can replenish. Ms. Henley discussed the private sector’s contribution to SCP and the 10YFP, focusing on generating industry action and sustainable building practice.

 

Meeting: Interactive panel discussion on “Sustainable Consumption and Production and the post-2015 development agenda: what needs to be implemented and measured” (co-organized by the Permanent Missions of Brazil and Finland, the secretariat of the 10-year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns (10YFP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP))
Date & Location: 18 February 2015.  Conference Room 11, United Nations Headquarters, New York
Speakers: Moderator Mr. Arab Hoballah, Chief of the Sustainable Lifestyles Cities and Industry Branch of UNEP’s Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE); H.E. Mr. Antonio de Aguiar Patriota, Permanent Representative of Brazil to the United Nations; H.E. Mr. Kai Jürgen Mikael Sauer, Permanent Representative of Finland to the United Nations; Ms. Alessandra Alfieri, Chief of Environmental-Economic Accounts Section, United Nations Statistics Division; Ms. Sue Riddlestone, Chief Executive and Co-Founder of Bioregional; and Ms. Jane Henley, CEO, World Green Building Council; Mr. Thembela Ngculu, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of the Republic of South Africa to the United Nations, and board member of the 10YFP Several National Representatives
Written by WIT Representative: Ellie Guner
Edited by WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Seminar on Peaceful and Inclusive Societies and Democratic Governance

International_Peace_Day_logoThis meeting elaborated on a report written by Dr. Timothy Sisk, whose presentation formed the majority of the afternoon’s discussion. Given that 2015 is the designated time for the 10-year review of the UN’s peacebuilding architecture, this talk about the foundational elements of a peaceful and inclusive society had particular relevance.

Dr. Sisk began his presentation by noting that, contrary to the typical level of discord among scholars, there is a broad consensus within the research community regarding the idea of peace as a prerequisite for development. Many elements of the UN’s post-2015 agenda are therefore tied to peaceful relations among and within countries around the world.

The principle finding of Dr. Sisk’s report is that poverty is increasingly concentrated in fragile and conflict-affected countries. For many the roughly 60-80 countries classified as fragile, violence, poverty, and poor governance have become mutually reinforcing elements of a vicious cycle that prevents the success of development initiatives. As violence is reduced, however, and post-conflict development is begun, virtuous cycles can be created.

Dr. Sisk’s report found that peace, development, and governance are all interrelated. The level of inclusivity and democratic participation within a society contributes both to peace and development—the presence of robust civil and political society and the establishment of norms of equality and inclusion have historically led to a rapid growth in democracy. Social cohesion is extremely important, especially in fragile states. When a state is on the path to development, no real results will be achieved without an underlying base of social cohesion.

Dr. Sisk concluded by urging a continued, dedicated effort at reducing conflict, including social and interpersonal violence. Further, in developing states, access to justice is vital in creating positive perceptions of a government for its citizens, and state accountability in general will encourage individual citizens to make personal investments in the country’s advancement.

Meeting: Seminar on “Peaceful and Inclusive Societies and Democratic Governance.”
Date & Location: 6 February 2015, Conference Room 8, United Nations Headquarters, New York.
Speakers: Ms. Yvonne Lodico, Head of the UNITAR New York Office; Mr. Massimo Tommasoli, Permanent Observer for International IDEA to the United Nations; Mr. Gustavo Meza-Cuadra Velásquez, Permanent Representative of Peru to the United Nations; Dr. Timothy Sisk, Professor, Associate Dean for Research, University of Denver; Thomas Gass, United Nations Assistant Secretary-General for Policy Coordination and Inter-Agency Affairs, Department of Economic and Social Affairs.
Written By WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Panel Discussion: Independent Oversight Role of Supreme Audit Institutions in Implementing the Post-2015 Development Agenda

A.post-2015_12This meeting was held to discuss the importance of supreme auditing institutions (SAI) in the post-2015 development agenda. The representative of UNDESA stated that SAIs are necessary if we want to go towards an inclusive and peaceful society with a focus on sustainable development. SAIs promote accountability in different critical sectors including education, healthcare, and water sanitation. He said that, looking forward, SAIs will play an even more significant role regarding implementing and promoting SDGs. He also stated that international communities should help developing countries foster transparency and efficiency.

Dr. Josef Moser outlined specific benefits of SAI, and what international cooperation with INTOSAI, encouraged by the UN for all levels, entails. He first asserted that MDGs can only be attained with cost-effective accountability, as there will be more impact per dollar invested. For shortcomings in government capacity or a lack of transparency, accountability, and/or ownership that could prevent the attainment of MDGs, INTOSAI can provide technical know-how and assessment through financial, compliance, and performance audits. However, SAIs face domestic obstacles, such as a lacking mandate to audit government performance or a lack rules regarding accounting, reporting, and monitoring. To foster national independence after capacity building through SAIs, Moser encouraged governments to intensify communication with INTOSAI.

Responding to a question on the extent of SAI’s presence in cooperating countries, Dr. Moser stated that SAI’s functions are grading standards and capacity building, as conducted by experts of the International Development Initiative within INTOSAI. He and Ambassador Oh emphasized that, as an international standard of practice is lacking in both developed and developing countries, SAIs are a platform of implementing MDGs that nations and organizations must make good use of.

Meeting: Panel discussion on “Independent Oversight Role of Supreme Audit Institutions in Implementing the Post-2015 Development Agenda”
Date & Location: Wednesday, January 21, 2015. Conference Room 8, United Nations Headquarters, New York
Speakers: H.E. Ambassador Martin Sajdik, Permanent Representative of Austria to the UN and President of ECOSOC; H.E. Ambassador Oh Joon, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the UN; Dr. Josef Moser, Secretary-General of INTOSAI and President of the Austrian Court of Audit, Representative of UNDESA
Written By WIT Representatives: Alis Yoo, Brian Lee, and James Victory
Edited By WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

The Oceans We Need for the Future We Want

Mr. Miliband explained that the Global Ocean Commission bridges ocean experts with business communities to explore environmental and political interests. Experts are concerned with the loss of ocean biodiversity due to increases in technology, demand for resources, and subsidies. The Global Ocean Commission proposed an SDG and addressed the Implementing Agreement to deal with the lack of governance in parts of the high seas, provide monetary benefits, and build partnerships. The Implementing Agreement solves the need for clearer routes in unprotected areas of the ocean and addresses the use of genetic marine resources. The decline of the ocean is evident, bringing a new matter to the debate: urgency.

The Global Ocean Commission promotes transparency among stakeholders and aligns interests (political) with UN leadership, national leadership, and economic incentives. Ms. Richards discussed the importance of the Implementing Agreement for marine biodiversity, climate change, ocean acidification, and SIDS. Strategies must be developed to sustain the ocean and stabilize SIDS’ economies. Governments need to promote swift and decisive action to protect, conserve, and share marine resources. Existing measures to conserve biodiversity are negligent. Saving the ocean is a joint effort. Mr. Deaner mentioned there are a couple of “ocean problems” piling up. He stated that countries are at a crucial point for tackling problems and offering solutions. The deepest dilemma agencies are facing is governance of the ocean. Part of the solution is creating a global, complementary framework to align current ideas for ocean sustainability. Ms. Svensson emphasized the need to have global and regional work linking climate change to ocean issues and the land to the sea. Human actions on land lead to waste in the ocean from higher plastic content to acidification. She concluded that the ocean is an economic, social, and cultural problem and not just an environmental issue.

Meeting: The Oceans We Need for the Future We Want: High time for the BBNJ to make the call to action

Date/Location: Wednesday, January 21st, 2015; 1:15 pm to 2:30 pm; Conference Room 5

Speakers: David Miliband, Co-Chair of the Global Ocean Commission; Max Diener, Legal Consultant of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico; Lisa Emelia Svensson, Sweden’s Ambassador for Oceans, Seas, and Freshwater Support; Shorna-Kay Richards, Deputy Permanent Representative of Jamaica

Written by: Paige Stokols and Ellie Guner

Event on: “Globalization and Sustainable Development: The Role of Governments, Non-Governmental Organizations and the Private Sector”

sdg2All representatives at the event on “Globalization and sustainable development: The role of governments, non-governmental organizations and the private sector”emphasized that each individual is a part of one humanity. NGOs should increase their participation in globalization with the UN and the private sector.

President Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser started the meeting by highlighting the importance of technology in our daily lives. Technology not only impacts economic growth, but also benefits the globalization of public policy and social structure. Moreover, the demand for globalization and sustainable development increases the need for international cooperation and government support. He and other representatives agreed that a stable government is required and governments thus need to work with NGOs and the private sector to make globalization more efficient.

Dr. B. K. Modi stated that the UN and NGOs cannot be separated and should work together with each other. Ambassador Michele Klein-Solomon said that globalization is a great benefit for the world because it gives positive aspects to all current and subsequent generations. However, he stated that there are unbalanced opportunities between individuals. Therefore, governments should fairly handle human capital to have more opportunities in peoples’ lives. Multi-cultural areas have become a norm in society rather than an exception and migration should be supplemented with education to promote cultural development.

Ambassador Anwarul K. Chowdhury and Mr. Gary C. K. Huang claimed that globalization cannot create more division or disparity. There are three objectives of globalization: education, sustainability, and transformation. More students should be in schools to get quality education to create global citizenship. Dr. Tageldin Hamad insisted that women should be always included in communities like NGOs in globalization. NGOs have an obligation to not ally with any particular government and to not be controlled by government bodies.

Ms. Isha Judd stated that sustainable development  should be based on children, as they always focus on unity and love. Since children never think about fear or lack, they teach us how to meditate and nurture. Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati compared today to a global boat. We are on the same boat and have an equal responsibility for globalization. Dr. Manohar Shinde stated that globalization needs to have global perspectives on economic and non-economic issues. Ms. Sharon Vosmek argued that very few numbers of women are working in the society. She emphasized that we live in a global community and women should be treated equally as men.

Meeting: Event on “Globalization and sustainable development: The role of governments, non-governmental organizations and the private sector” (co-organized by the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), the Universal Peace Federation (UPF) and the Global Citizen Forum)
Date: 31 October 2014
Location: Dag Hammarskjöld Auditorium, UN HQ, New York
Speakers: Ambassador Tariq Al-Ansari, H.E. President Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, Dr. B.K. Modi, Dr. Thomas Walsh, Ambassador Michele Klein-Solomon, Ambassador Anwarul K. Chowdhury, Ambassador Noel Sinclair, Dr. Tageldin Hamad, Ms. Isha Judd, Mr. Kelly Wright, Sadhvi Bhagawati Saraswati, Dr. Manohar Shinde, Ms. Sharon Vosmek, and Mr. Gary C.K. Huang.
Written by WIT Representative: Minji Han

Edited by WIT Representative: Philip Bracey and Aslesha Dhillon

Second Committee: Operational Activities for Development

6365386329_f24a5e7976_zMs. Zina Mounla stated that in response to ECOSOC resolution 2013/5, the full analysis of funding of United Nations operational activities for development has, for the first time, been merged into the Secretary-General’s report on the implementation of the Quadrennial comprehensive policy review. The funding analysis consolidates financial data on contributions and expenditures of the UN entities that reported funding for operational activities for development in 2012. Together, the UN operational activities for development account for approximately 60 per cent of the funding for all UN system-wide activities. Peacekeeping operations accounted for about 20 per cent, while the global norm and standard setting, policy and advocacy functions of the United Nations system accounted for the remaining 20 per cent. The funding environment remains challenging as almost all of this growth was in the form of non-core resources.

She further noted that while an increase in core funding remains a priority, contributions from countries towards their own country programmes and private sector partnerships are key elements to these strategies. Mr. Gopinathan Achamkulangare introduced JIU’s report on the ‘Selection and appointment process for United Nations Resident Coordinators, including preparation, training and support provided for their work.’ The report provides an assessment of the operation of the existing selection and appointment process for the UN Resident Coordinators, and the effectiveness and efficiency of the related institutional support mechanism, including the preparation, training and support provided. The report identifies and analyses the existing challenges faced in the selection and appointment process of Resident Coordinators and makes recommendations aimed at improving it.

Mr. Yiping Zhou introduced the report of the Secretary-General on “The State of South-South cooperation”. This report reviews the main trends and progress made by the UN development system to bolster support to South-South and triangular cooperation for development over the past year. Mr Zhou highlighted that there are enormous opportunities for South-South cooperation in achieving the internationally-agreed development goals, including the MDGs, while anticipating the post-2015 development agenda. Furthermore, the report recommended the establishment of an interagency coordination mechanism under the UNDG to enhance and support the south-south cooperation. It also recommended focusing UN support on those areas where it has previously proved more effective.

Meeting: 26th and 27th Meetings of the Second Committee: Operational activities for development (A/69/215) [item 24]
Date: 29 October 2014
Speakers: Ms. Zina Mounla (DESA on behalf of Assistant Secretary General, Thomas Gass); Mr.Gopinathan Achamkulangare (Inspector, JIU); Mr. Yiping Zhou (Envoy of the Secretary General on South-South Cooperation).
Location: Conference Room 2, UN Headquarters, New York.
Written by WIT Representative: Aslesha Dhillon

Edited by WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Spotlight on the Development Cooperation Forum

03-20-Wu-Sajdik-BerlinThis session of the Development Cooperation Forum (DCF) was organized to allow stakeholders to elaborate how development cooperation will have to change in order to help implement a transformative post 2015 development agenda. The following two key questions were addressed: How will different actors be able to support a unified and universal set of goals, and how can national ownership and coordination be guaranteed in this context?

Mr. Wennubst presented key messages from the 2013 High level Symposium held in Switzerland. He said that a key feature of the post-2015 development agenda will be the inclusion of the universality principle towards sustainable development to ensure poverty eradication. He also highlighted the importance of accountability. Mr. Bapna elaborated on the role of development cooperation in implementing a forward-looking post-2015 development framework. He said that development cooperation plays the role of a catalyst, which accelerates local efforts. He said that development finance is a key component of development cooperation. Mr. Bapna explained that ODA, which makes up about 70% of external financing and 10% of GDP, plays a very significant role in low-income countries.

Mr. Semodji explained the division of labor between different development actors. He said that the role of developing countries, according to the Monterrey Consensus, is that they have to define clear strategies for the basis of their development. The role envisioned for international, multilateral, bilateral and non-governmental actors was that they will be able to provide technical and financial assistance. He said that the international actors have played their role in this regard. However, Mr. Semodji said that there were problems in the implementation of this role. Mr. Premajayantha said that an effective intervention of DCF is crucial. He also emphasized that the coordination of all stakeholders and projects is vital. The key factors for poverty eradication and sustainable development are a peaceful atmosphere in countries, political stability, and effective management of human and physical resources, he explained. Ms. Akhtar called for a much deeper and broader inter-governmental cooperation that institutes an effective global governance system.

 

Meeting Title: Advancing a unified and universal development agenda, 2014 Development Cooperation Forum
Speakers: H.E. Vladimir Drobnjak (Croatia), Vice-President of the Economic and Social Council; Ms. Amina Mohammed, Special Adviser of the Secretary-General on Post-2015 Development Planning (Moderator); Mr. Pio Wennubst, Assistant Director-General of the Swiss Agency for Development Cooperation; H.E. Susil Premajayantha, Minister of Environment and Renewable Energy, Sri Lanka; H.E. Mawussi Djossou Semodji, Minister of Planning, Togo; Mr. Manish Bapna, Executive Vice-President and Managing Director, World Resources Institute; H.E. Hélèn Laverdierè, Member of Parliament, Canada; Ms. Shamshad Akhtar, Executive Secretary, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific.
Date: 10 June 2014
Location: Conference Room 1 (CB), United Nations HQ, New York
Written By WIT Representative: Shan Cheema
Edited By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

 

ODA Improvements for the Post 2015 Development Agenda

enjoToday as a part of the Development Cooperation Forum, a meeting was held to discuss the role of Official Development Assistance (ODA) in the post 2015 development agenda. Beginning the meeting, Ms. Randel gave a statement on the critical role of ODA in eradicating extreme poverty, and how to target and better mobilize resources for development. In recent years ODA has increased, with 2013 having the highest recorded ODA expenditures. However, Ms. Randel pointed out that ODA must focus on impacting the bottom 20% of Least Developed Countries (LDCs). Ms. Randel also pointed out the importance of harnessing other resources for development like foreign direct investment, remittances, and public/private debt flows.

Following, H.E. Mr. Géro of Benin spoke about how ODA is needed as a tool for investment in developing countries for roads, energy infrastructure, transportation, and industrialization. Markets are very new in developing countries, and oftentimes developing countries are excluded from participating in the global market, so ODA is needed to make up for this deficit. He concluded by stating that ODA must not be guided by political considerations, but rather guided by considerations of what development objectives we hope to achieve.

Next, Mr. Solheim from OECD gave a statement on suggestions to improve ODA. He said that ODA should be targeted more towards LDCs, because even though overall ODA amounts are increasing, they are decreasing for LDCs and fragile states. Mr. Solheim also suggested improving ODA by targeting it towards encouraging more private investment, supporting peace, and using it to assist countries in domestic resource mobilization and better taxation systems.

Following, Mr. Alonso emphasized the importance of ODA in Middle Income Countries (MICs), stating that MICs need development assistance as well in order for them to meet their development goals. Overall, there has been a reduction in global absolute poverty, but an increase in relative poverty in MICs.

Concluding the meeting, H.E. Mr. Phuong of Viet Nam stated that in the post 2015 development agenda, ODA should be used together with public expenditures to attract private investment, directly tackle poverty, and support developing countries socioeconomic development plans. He also called for climate change adaptation projects, the efficient use of natural resources, institutional reforms, and capacity building to help developing countries tap into their national funds.

 

Meeting Title: Development Cooperation Forum Session 2 “The critical role of Offical Development Assistance (ODA) in development cooperation post-2015”
Speakers: Ms. Judith Randel, Executive Director, Development Initiatives, United Kingdom of Great Britian and Northern Ireland; His Excellency Fulbert Amoussouga Géro, Minister at the Presidency of the Republic of Benin, in charge of coordinating policies and implementation of the MDGs and the SDGs; Mr. Erik Solheim, Chair, Development Assistance Committee, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); Mr. José Antonio Alonso, Professor, Universidad Complutense of Madrid; H.E. Nguyen The Phuong, Vice Minister of Planning and Investment, Viet Nam
Date: 10 July 2014
Location: Conference Room 2, United Nations HQ, New York
Written By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

 

Financing for Gender Equality and Women’s Rights

In order to put emphasis on strengthening accountability, transparency and financing for gender equality and women’s rights, a discussion was held to address the role of development cooperation in supporting the implementation of the post-2015 development agenda. Ms. Khan began by highlighting the importance of strengthening political support for better financing in dealing with gender equality. Three specific areas were discussed, including mutual accountability and transparency, aid quantity and quality and the engagement of the diversity of development cooperation actors.

Next, Mr. Smith stressed how this is an important subject as an entry point to discuss the techniques needed to make progress.He specifically talked about the importance of easy access to information, which would empower and create solutions for solving grand societal challenges. Mr. Hendra then pointed out it is a must to build a more robust understanding of all countries on their specific situations. In addition, it is essential to strengthen government accountability and identify measures to address gender equality efficiently. This is necessary to maintain a transformative post-2015 development agenda.557630-genderrights-1370150215-998-640x480

Ms. Craviotto then briefly discussed the trends in funding for women’s rights, including the role of the private sector. She also quoted examples of various countries and their experiences in tracking allocations for gender equality. Ms. O’Neill explained the analysis on donor investments in gender equality, and women’s rights towards the implementation of the post-2015 development agenda. Based on the latest report published in March, the total amount of bilateral aid targeting gender equality and women’s empowerment tripled from 8 million USD in 2002 to 24 billion USD in 2012, resulting in an annual average growth rate of 12%. The increase in aid to gender equality and women’s empowerment is one of the most tangible outcomes of MDG 3 – promote gender equality and empower women.

 

Meeting Title: What women get: promoting transparency and accountability in financing for gender equality and women’s rights
Speakers: Ms. Zohra Khan, Policy Advisor of Governance and National Planning, UN Women; Mr. Anthony Smith, Director for International Cooperation, Department for International Development, United Kingdom; Mr. John Hendra, Assistant Secretary General and Deputy Executive Director, UN Women; Ms. Nerea Craviotto, Lead Advocacy Coordinator, Association for Women’s Rights in Development (AWID); Ms. Patti O’Neill, Head of Division, Global Policies and Partnerships, Development Cooperation Directorate, OECD
Location: Conference Room C, United Nations HQ, New York
Date: 10 July 2014
Written By WIT representative: Samantha Kong
Edited By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan