58th Session of the Commission for Social Development (CSocD58)

Source: http://www.un.org/development/desa

The Commission for Social Development (CSocD58) is the advisory body responsible for the social development pillar of global development within the United Nations. The commission is currently holding its 58th Session at the United Nations headquarters in New York from February 10- 19th2020. Also, as a highlight during the 2020 session, the Commission for Social Development is celebrating its 75th anniversary, and the 25th anniversary of the Copenhagen Declaration for Social Development.

The theme for the 58th Session of the Commission for Social Development is “Affordable housing and social protection systems for all to address homelessness

During the first meeting of the 58th Commission for Social Development, H.E. Mr. Wulfran announced the newly elected officers, and vice presidents in different regions. United nations Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, Mr. Zhenmin, in his remark showed the follow-up to the World Summit for Social Development and the twenty-fourth extraordinary session of the General Assembly with the Priority theme: “Affordable Housing and Social Protection Systems for All to Address Homelessness”. He mentioned the novel Corona virus, which is impacting China, and spreading all around the world. Global efforts to prevent the novel corona virus is necessary for social protection. The effort for china in global health and support to outbreak the novel Corona virus soon. Provision of adequate, safe and, affordable housing, expansion of social impact, adoption of climate change, partnership with government, and civil society is the priority theme for social protection, development, and policy.

Chair of the NGO Committee for Social Development, Mr. Perell recognized that the implementation of the Copenhagen Declaration and the Programme of Action, the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, Action for Youth, four the objectives of the International Year of the Family and their follow-up processes. He also highlighted the role of non-governmental organizations, civil society actors, in advancing the implementation of the Copenhagen Declaration and the Programme of Action and, in this respect, the work of the Commission. The important thing is encouraging the member state to find the tool and take advantage to consider a new approach for the decade of action delivery for social hosing development with the universal definition for homelessness, academic study, and policy declaration.

https://www.un.org/development/desa/dspd/2019/10/inclusive-united-cities/

Representative in Youth, Ms. Tan Ja Yi recognized the homeless social protection services with member state commitment to invest prioritize and underrate and lifelong system for youth. She pointed out providing to every child in the same line is need able to give good nutrient food, financial aid for high education, etc. According to UNICEF reports, the government programs still challenge to provide education to all children go the school and need some resources to analyze. She talked about the review of relevant United Nations plans and programs of action about the situation of social groups, especially youth and women.

Director of DESA’s Division for Inclusive Social Development, Ms. Bas briefly emphasized the Social dimensions of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the African Union’s Agenda have triggered progress and shifted the way African governments and their development partners consider about the gap’s challenges related to social, economic, and political transformation in Africa. For the National dimension of a new partnership in African, we should produce social progress, political development of Africa, improve the living standard and going forward to prioritize their policy for sustainable growth, and universal education or health.

She pointed government leaders and decision-makers at national level should continue to champion sound governance and focus on the provision of public goods and services. She also highlighted the policy tool for portable housing can affect society and show the result by implementing the social framework. United Nations system organizations and African Union institutions should continue to establish more formal and consistent coordination.

Meeting: 58th session of the Commission for Social Development

Date/Location: Monday 10th February 2020; 10:00 am to 1:00 pm; Conference Room 4, United Nations Headquarters, New York, NY

Speakers
H.E. Mr. Gbolié Desiré Wulfran IPO, Chairperson of commission for social development

Mr. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs 

Daniel Perell, Chair of the NGO Committee for Social Development.

Olivia Tan Ja Yi, Representative in Youth and Yale University

Daniela Bas, Director of DESA’s Division for Inclusive Social Development

Written By: WIT Representative Huijun Edelyn Park

Cracking Down on Gender-Related Violence

https://i2.wp.com/america.aljazeera.com/content/ajam/articles/2014/8/15/france-passes-sweepinggenderequalitylaw/jcr:content/headlineImage.adapt.1460.high.081514_France.1408103599446.jpg

Today there was a meeting held by the Mission of Qatar and UN Women about the importance of documenting conflict-related sexual and gender based violence as a first step toward accountability.

Recently, there have been mass displacements and increases in violence around the world. Rape, forced marriage, and sexual slavery continue to occur in the ongoing battle against sexual and gender-based crimes. In order to efficiently investigate and document these crimes, the need for accountability is fulfilled by the Justice Rapid Response (JRR)-UN Women SGBV Justice Experts Roster.

The speakers discussed specific investigations that enabled the prosecution to raise awareness about these crimes, including those in North Korea, Iraq, and Syria. Ms. Davidian led the meeting and gave a background on how JRR was founded. On September 28th, 2009, there was a massive crackdown in Guinea against a protest for democracy that led to 150 deaths. The Secretary-General established a Commission of Inquiry, and UN Women found that 109 acts of sexual violence had occurred that day. Seeing the need to bring attention to these crimes, the JRR partnership and institute started. Qualified experts from all over the world are trained for 7-10 days, specifically on sexual, gender-based violence, and placed on a roster. Today, approximately 170 professionals are available to assist inquiry and investigations and document to ensure accountability. They ensure linguistic and cultural diversity on the roster to aid victims all around the world.

Ms. Ahmed ensured Arabic speaking professionals on the roster as Qatar’s contribution and stressed the necessity to work harder to prevent such crimes protecting women and girls in armed conflict. Mr. Wenaweser and Mr. Garcia presented Liechtenstein and Argentina’s firm support towards the JRR initiative respectively. Ms. Madenga led a discussion about finding patterns of Boko Haram violence against people.

Meeting: Securing Accountability for Conflict-Related Sexual and Gender Based Crimes

Date/Location: Wednesday, March 16th, 2016; 10:00-13:00; Conference Room 9

Speakers: H.E. Ms. Alya Ahmed Saif Al-Thani, Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of the State of Qatar to the UN; H.E. Mr. Christian Wenaweser, Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the UN; H.E. Mr. Martín Garcia Moritán, Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Argentina to the UN; Mr. Tim Mawe, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Ireland to the UN; Ms. Federica Tronchin, SGBV and MENA Region Programme Manager, Justice Rapid Response; Ms. Alison Davidian, Transitional Justice Policy Specialist, UN Women; Ms. Renifa Madenga, SGBV investigator deployed to the Boko Haram Fact Finding Mission

Written By: WIT Representative Jin Yoo

Edited By: WIT Representative Alex Margolick

Photo Credit: Francois Guillot / AFP / Getty Images

MDG Progress Review – Qatar, UK, and Kuwait

Millennium-Development-Goals-for-2015Today, as part of the Annual Ministerial Review on development, Qatar, the UK, and Kuwait gave their respective countries’ development reports, and had these reports reviewed by their peers as part of the monitoring and evaluation process of the millennium development goals (MDGs). Beginning the meeting, the representative from Qatar presented Qatar’s National Development Strategy (NDS), which covers the period from 2011-2016. So far it’s found that Qatar has done exceedingly well in GNI per capita (ranking 1st globally), and in having high levels of citizen satisfaction with life. However, the NDS report pointed out population growth as a major challenge to development in Qatar. Qatar’s population has grown from 1.4 million in 2008 to 2.1 million in 2013, with almost a quarter of a million more people expected by 2014. Population growth places a burden on schools, hospitals, housing, and other aspects of social infrastructure. Traffic congestion and accidents were also highlighted as main challenges for Qatar. Concluding the presentation, proposed future actions for development include creating a high-level sustainable development committee, ensuring the integration of environmental and social concerns, and improving quantitative and qualitative measures of well-being.

Next, the UK’s development report was presented. The UK is the only G8 country to reach the UN set target of allocating .7% of its GNI for official development assistance (ODA). Furthermore, the UK identified its key priorities for development as gender equality, education and health, humanitarian work, multilateral aid effectiveness, reducing barriers to economic growth, supporting capital market development in Sub Saharan Africa, and international efforts to combat tax evasion and corruption. To promote development, the UK has given 40% of its bilateral aid to Sub Saharan Africa. Furthermore, in 2013, the UK gave 4.4 billion pounds to 40 different multilateral aid agencies. The presentation concluded with a quote from the UK’s International Development Secretary, Justine Greening, “Development is in all of our interests. Helping other countries to grow and develop means a better, more prosperous future for Britain too.”

Lastly, Kuwait gave its presentation on its development progress. So far, Kuwait has done relatively well in meeting the MDGs. By 2011, only .33% of its population lived on less than $1.25 per day, by 2012 97% of children were enrolled in primary schools, and Kuwait has seen a significant improvement in maternal health – 1.7 deaths for every 100,000 births as of 2012. However, increasing CO2 levels in Kuwait remain a challenge, and water desalination and power stations are main sources of pollution. Thus far, Kuwait has been successful in building a global partnership for development – allocating 1.23% of its GNI for ODA, hosting the first Arab summit on economic and social development, and creating the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development. The meeting concluded with reviews by peer countries of the development reports.

 

Meeting Title: Annual Ministerial Review National Voluntary Presentations: Qatar, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and Kuwait
Speakers: H.E. Mr. Saleh bin Mohammad Al Nabit, Minister of Development Planning and Statistics, Qatar; Mr. Anthony Smith, Head, International Relations, Department for International Development, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; H.E. Mr. Mansour Ayyad SH A Alotaibi, Permanent Representative of Kuwait
Date: 9 July 2014
Location: Conference Room 2, United Nations HQ, New York
Written By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

Implementing Rio+20 And The Future We Want

In order to ensure implementation and universality of the post-2015 development agenda, a ministerial dialogue was held to discuss the ingredients needed to develop coherent and integrated elements of the agenda. Ms. Clark moderated the panel. She mentioned the post-2015 development agenda must tackle the emerging challenges that are applicable to all countries. For instance, climate change has been affecting people’s lives in the past few years and its impacts were obvious. She emphasized the need to reflect the shared aspirations of people and countries so that no one is left behind.Unknown-8

Mr. Potočnik mentioned three important ingredients in the development agenda. First, maintain a good balance among all three dimensions of sustainable development, namely social, economic, and environmental. Next, it is important to maintain a transformative agenda. Hence, a global partnership is vital for every country. Each country should focus on having a coherent, enabling policy environment, and the full mobilization of all its available resources, including private finance and a strong accountability framework.

In addition, Ms. Nana highlighted an effective and efficient coordination mechanism from the global to the local level. She also stressed that gender must be a central pillar to address inequality and poverty. This would ensure all inclusive growth and an equal society. Also, she pointed out the inclusion of civil society, youth, women and the private sector in the planning process.

Mr. Yoon stressed the importance of tackling poverty eradication, ecosystem resilience building, and enhanced gender equality. He mentioned that accountable, transparent and effective governance are the key factors in building an integrated development agenda. Lastly, Ms. Velo outlined a universal and integrated approach, which is capable of capturing the three major dimensions of sustainable development. It is necessary to have an innovative culture of governance with inclusiveness and accountability. She ended by calling for new ways of understanding and measuring the progress of the sustainable development goals.

 

Meeting Title: HLPF Ministerial Dialogue “A universal integrated policy agenda to implement Rio+20 and realize the future we want”
Speakers: Ms. Clark Helen, Administrator of UNDP; H.E. Mr. Janez Potočnik, European Commissioner for the Environment; H.E. Ms. Lithur, Nana Oye, Minister for Gender, Children and Social Protection, Ghana; H.E. Mr. Yoon Seong-kyu, Minister of Environment, Republic of Korea; H.E. Ms. Silvia Velo, Under Secretary for Environment, Land and Sea, Italy
Location: Trusteeship Council, United Nations HQ, New York
Date: 7 July 2014
Written By WIT representative: Samantha Kong
Edited By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

Consumer Information and Sustainable Consumption and Production

As part of the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development, a side event was held to discuss the availability of consumer information, and its impact on sustainable consumption and production (proposed goal 12 of the sustainable development goals). Beginning the meeting, the Vice-President of ECOSOC gave a statement on the launch of the Consumer Information Programme, which provides accurate information about the sustainability of various goods and services and helps to guide consumers towards more sustainable choices. By 2030, the global population of middle class consumers will increase by 2-3 billion people, putting more stress on the environment and natural resources, and making it vital for the world to consume more efficiently with less of an impact.

ImageFollowing, H.E. Mr. Thoms stated how sustainable consumption and production encompass all dimensions of sustainable development (economic, social, and environment), and that it’s important to inform consumers about sustainable consumption and production so they can direct their purchasing power towards more sustainable goods and services. Furthermore, Mr. Bastaman from Indonesia added that information about sustainable consumption and production is relatively new in developing countries, and that both the Indonesian government and business sectors are striving to provide more information to consumers.

Next, Dr. Jaeckel, Mr. Wardojo, and Mr. MacMullan gave presentations on the role of transparency and accountability for consumer information in achieving sustainable consumption and production. They highlighted that providing consumers with accurate and accountable information is a multi stakeholder task, which includes governments, NGOs, inter-governmental organizations, and the private sector. Consumers are mainly interested in a product’s cost, convenience, and if the product meets the consumer’s needs. However, ethical and moral questions of sustainability are becoming part of the equation. In order to raise sustainability on the consumer’s agenda, information about how the product is made must be provided in a clear and simple way, in order toencourage sustainable patterns of consumption.

 

Meeting Title: Consumer Information Programme Under the 10 Year Framework of Programmes on Sustainable Consumption and Production Patterns
Speakers: H.E. Mr. Vladimi Drobnjak, Vice President of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), Permanent Representative of Crotia; H.E. Mr. Heiko Thoms, Deputy Permanent Representative of Germany; Mr. Henry Bastaman, Deputy Minister, Ministry of Environment, Indonesia; Dr. Ulf D. Jaeckel, Head of Sustainable Consumer Production, Product-related Environmental Protection, Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety, Germany; Mr. Noer Adi Wardojo, Ministry of Environment, Indonesia; Mr. Justin MacMullan, Head of Advocacy, Consumer International
Date: 1 July 2014
Location: ECOSOC Chamber, United Nations HQ, New York
Written By WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

Civil Society Perspectives on the Post 2015 Development Agenda

Unknown-5Today, various civil society groups came together to discuss the post 2015 development agenda, and to give their input on what should be included in the sustainable development goals (SDGs). All of the NGOs present agreed the agenda must be universal, and prioritized addressing inequality as one of the biggest concerns the SDGs should tackle.

The first half of the meeting addressed policy coherence in the post 2015 development agenda, and called for coordinated efforts in the public and private sectors to build sustainable partnerships for development. The Rio +20 Conference was also referenced, and a focus was given to how at the conference an agreement was made to establish the SDGs and address resource mobilization for sustainability. In order to have effective goals, they must be universal, measurable, and integrate all aspects of sustainable development including economic, social, and environmental. The NGOs present called for a holistic approach to the SDGs, stressed sustainable consumption and production patterns, and agreed on the need for an accountability framework.

The second half of the meeting focused on equality, employment, and decent work for all. Eliminating extreme poverty has to start with eliminating inequalities, and a key way to do that is to provide employment and decent work for all people regardless of race, religion, gender, ethnicity, age, etc. There was a focus on eliminating gender inequality, and persistent inequality between rural and urban areas. In order for there to be fair employment and decent work for all, these inequalities must be addressed. The NGOs called for SDGs that focus on fair employment and addressing inequalities. They also called for the need to create an enabling environment for cooperatives and small businesses in order for the local economy to thrive. The meeting concluded with a question and answer session from the audience.

 

Meeting Title: Event entitled “Civil society perspectives on the Post-2015 agenda” (organized by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) and the Delegation of the European Union)
Speakers: Timo Makela, Director of International Affairs, LIFE & Eco-Innovation, DG Environment, European Commission; Evelyne Pichenot, French Economic and Social and Environmental Council, EESC Member; Jonas Keding Lindholm, Save the Children; An Le Nouail Marliere, General Confederation of Labour, EESC Member; Constanza Martinez, Deputy Head of IUCN Global Policy Unit, Dominic White, WWF; Sascha Gabizon, Women International for a Common Future; Helen Dennis, Senior Advisor for Christian Aid on Poverty & Inequality
Date: 19 June 2014
Location: NLB Conference Room 5, United Nations HQ, New York
Written by WIT Representative: Marli Kasdan

 

ECOSOC Discusses Social Development and Human Settlements

downloadThe 23rd coordination and management meeting was held at ECOSOC on 12 June. This high panel discussion gathered representatives of CSOD, UN Habitat and CEB to discuss the drafted resolution on social development and human settlements. “Promoting empowerment of people in achieving poverty eradication, social integration and decent work for all is the priority theme”, representative of CSOD said in her introductory statement. She highlighted the critical importance of empowerment in accelerating the implementation of the Millennium Development Goals. In light of that, she stressed that synergies must be created between empowerment policies and the current work to strengthen the three pillars of sustainable development. She repeatedly emphasized the need for increased and effective participation by youth in decision-making processes at all levels, including the post-2015 processes.

Director of UN-Habitat reported the role of UN-Habitat at the global level, which aims at working with a wide range of partners to prepare and consult the post-2015 development agenda and sustainable development goals. It also closely cooperates with international financial institutions and the International Aid Transparency Initiative. She suggested several recommendations on implementing the Habitat Agenda. She pointed out the need of appropriate consideration on the role of urbanization for better implementation of sectorial policies within cities and urban settlements. This would enhance economic productivity and equity, to implement economic empowerment programs that create opportunities for the youth and women.

Ms. Simona outlined the five transformational shifts that are required to drive the universal post-2015 development agenda, including leaving no one behind, putting sustainable development at the core, transforming economics for jobs and inclusive growth, building peace and effective, open and accountable institutions for all and forging a new global partnership. She concluded by highlighting the five critical interlinked elements for the post-2015 development agenda: universality, integration, equality, human rights and data revolution.

Meeting Title: 23rd coordination and management meeting: Social development and human settlements
Speakers: Ms. Sewa Lamsal Adhikari, Chair of CSOD 52; Ms. Simona Mirela Miculescu, Chair of CSOD 53; Director of UN-Habitat, Ms. Simona Petrova, Director of the Chief Executive Board (CEB) Secretariat
Location: United Nations HQ, ECOSOC
Date: 12 June 2014
Written By WIT representative: Samantha Kong